Madera County sees agricultural income decline in 2020

Pistachio acreage increased significantly – from 41,800 acres to 47,600 acres – for a $ 90 million year-over-year increase in 2020 in Madera County. Photo file

published on August 31, 2021 – 3:04 PM
Written by Edward Smith

Madera County reports an overall loss in farm income for 2020.

Madera County is ranked No. 10 in California with crop production valued at $ 1.95 billion last year, down $ 52.03 million – 2.6% – year over year. ‘other.

Agricultural Commissioner Rusty Landsberger attributes loss to Covid-19 conditions, ongoing drought, water deliveries, labor shortages, export markets and declining product value basic. Ag values ​​also fell in 2019 compared to 2018, largely attributed to price stabilization.

Almonds and milk kept their # 1 and # 2 places, respectively, while pistachios started grape products to take the # 3 position. Figs moved up to # 7 after not be in the top ten in 2019.

The almond production area increased to 157,000 harvested acres from 149,000 acres in 2019. Production per acre also increased to 1.21 tonnes from 1.12. Overall, however, prices per tonne fell to $ 3,482 from $ 4,821. The total value of the almonds fell to $ 661.48 million from $ 804.53 million.

In 2020, shipping disruptions disrupted export markets, negatively impacting Madera County’s nut harvest.

Overall, the area under vines declined in 2020 compared to 2019. A slight increase in table grape values ​​was not enough to counter a drop of 500 acres. Combined with lower productivity, the value of table grapes declined from $ 44.26 million to $ 32.49 million. The most popular variety of raisins almost halved to $ 44.62 million from $ 80.34 million in 2019. In total, grapes fell to $ 221.03 million from $ 267.76 millions of dollars.

Pistachio acreage increased significantly – from 41,800 to 47,600 acres – for a $ 90 million year-over-year increase. Pistachios were valued at $ 285.41 million compared to $ 191.67 million in 2019.

In total, fruits and nuts fell to $ 1.34 billion from $ 1.42 billion in 2019.
After suffering an initial decline in value with the closure of restaurants and schools, milk increased its value by $ 44.36 million to reach $ 317.87 million. Not only did production go from 16,780,000 to 17,090,000 quintals, but the price per quintal rose to $ 18.60 from $ 16.30 in 2019.

Those in the dairy industry attributed the increases to a federal government dairy purchase program.

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